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David J. Brailer Resigns as Health IT Czar


New York, Apr 20, 2006

Secretary of Health and Human Services Michael O. Leavitt announced this evening that he has accepted the resignation of Dr. David J. Brailer as National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. Brailer was appointed to the position by President George W. Bush on May 6, 2004.

Brailer’s office was responsible for the award and administration of four contracts supporting the creation of an interoperable, standards-based Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN) in support of President George W. Bush’s goal to establish the widespread adoption of electronic healthcare records within ten years. The American National Standards Institute received one of the contract awards to fund the Healthcare Information Technology Standards Panel. The Panel’s mission is to assist in the development of a Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN) by addressing the standards-related issues impacting the harmonization of healthcare data and networks.

“Over the past two years, David has made significant progress in advancing the President's health IT agenda and laying the building blocks for future progress,” Leavitt said in a HHS press release.

The Secretary’s statement continued with an indication that Brailer has agreed to serve as vice-chair of the American Health Information Community (The Community), which is charged with making recommendations to the Secretary of HHS to facilitate the development and adoption of standards-based health IT.

“David has helped the Community identify promising breakthroughs for near-term progress while continuing to move us closer to longer-term health IT goals,” said Leavitt. “David will also continue to serve as a consultant to HHS to help lead the President's health care transparency initiative.”

A Financial Times online news article attributed Brailer’s departure to “family reasons” and his confidence that the program “is now mature and moving in the right direction.”

A replacement for Brailer has yet to be named.


Click here to read an interview with Dr. Brailer from the Winter 2006 ANSI Reporter

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