ANSI - American National Standards Institute
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ANSI Seeks Experts for the Revision of ISO/IEC Guide 50, Safe aspects - Guidelines for child safety


New York, Jan 17, 2012

At its September 2011 meeting, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Management Board (TMB) moved to initiate the revision of ISO/IEC Guide 50 – child safety guidelines published by ISO and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). As a member of the ISO TMB, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) can name up to two experts to serve on the ad hoc group being formed to pursue this revision effort.

ISO/IEC Guide 50, Safety aspects – Guidelines for child safety, provides a framework for addressing potential sources of unintentional hazards to which children might be exposed during their use of, or interaction with, a product, service, or system. This includes information on the general approach to child safety, including specific developmental characteristics of children that place them at a particular risk of injury. The guide is primarily intended for those involved in the preparation and revision of standards that will be used by product designers, architects, manufacturers, service providers, communicators, and policy makers in a way to minimize possible injury to children, and is designed to be used in conjunction with ISO/IEC Guide 51, Safety aspects — Guidelines for their inclusion in standards.

Revisions to ISO/IEC Guide 50 would update the current edition, which was published in 2002 by the ISO/IEC Joint Technical Advisory Group (JTAG) for Child Safety. ISO/IEC Guide 50 was originally published in 1987.

Individuals interested in serving as one of the two ANSI experts should send contact details and a short CV to Steve Cornish, ANSI senior director for international policy, at scornish@ansi.org by close of business on Friday, January 27, 2012. Suggestions of other U.S. persons who ANSI might consider to serve in this capacity are also welcome by this same deadline.

Depending on the number of candidates received, ANSI may need to ask the ANSI ISO Council to approve the two final candidates, and ANSI may wish to form a virtual U.S. Technical Advisory Group (TAG) to support the efforts of these two experts.

ANSI Nanotechnology Standards Panel